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Matthew R. Rosengart, MD, MPH

Associate Professor, Surgery and Critical Care Medicine
Co-Director, Surgical Trauma Intensive Care Unit, UPMC Presbyterian

412.647.0860
412-647-0597
Admin Assistant: Kris Baldridge
412.647.3065


Matthew R. Rosengart, MD MPH received his undergraduate education at the Johns Hopkins University. He completed training in general surgery, an NIH fellowship in molecular biology, and a Master in Public Health at the University of Washington, whereafter he pursued a Trauma/Surgical Critical Care fellowship. He then joined the Departments of Surgery and Critical Care Medicine faculty at the University of Pittsburgh in 2004. Dr. Rosengart’s clinical practice has been devoted to care of the critically injured and critically ill ICU patient. His general surgery practice includes surgery for complex abdominal wall hernias, gallbladder disease, small and large bowel pathology, and complex pilonidal disease. His laboratory focuses upon the molecular biology of sepsis, hemorrhage, and traumatic injury in the contexts of organ injury, dysfunction, recovery and the aging process.

Dr. Rosengart’s lab has a long-standing record of examining the role of innate immunity in the systemic response to injury and infection, with particular expertise in calcium-dependent mechanisms and a translational perspective. His laboratory has focused upon the mechanisms involved in the response to injury in relevant sepsis and trauma models such as LPS-induced inflammation and organ dysfunction, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) polymicrobial sepsis, warm hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and hemorrhagic shock. Extending these investigations, our laboratory he has defined the regulatory roles of calcium and CaMK transduction in the adaptive responses of autophagy, mitophagy, and mitochondrial biogenesis during sepsis-induced organ dysfunction and organ recovery. The translational perspective of his studies has provided mechanistic insight into the clinically relevant outcomes of organ dysfunction and survival. Recently his laboratory has focused on characterizing the immunomodulatory effects of light and its dimension (i.e. photoperiod, insolation, spectrum) on the host response to both septic and sterile insults. His clinical expertise is Injury Epidemiology with particular focuses in trauma system development and cognitive and decisional behavioral sciences in the context of compliance with evidence-based guidelines. He has additional on-going clinical-epidemiological studies in the areas of comparative effectiveness of processes of patient care, prolonged critical illness, sepsis, and multiple organ dysfunction.

 

Education & Training

Degree

Year

Field

The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD B.A. 1987-1991 Biology
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL M.D. 1991-1995 Medicine
University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL Residency 1995-1998 General Surgery
University of Washington, Seattle, WA Fellowship 1998-2000 Molecular Biology
University of Washington, Seattle, WA Residency 2000-2002 General Surgery
University of Washington, Seattle, WA MPH 2002-2003 Epidemiology
University of Washington, Seattle, WA Fellowship 2002-2004 Trauma/Critical Care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative Titles/Positions

Years Location/Department Titles
2013- University of Pittsburgh CTSI Associate Professor with tenure
2011- University of Pittsburgh Surgery Associate Professor with tenure
2011- University of Pittsburgh Critical Care Medicine Associate Professor with tenure

 

Current and Completed Research Projects

Ongoing Research Projects

Light therapy in Critical Illness
CaMK: Central regulators of the inflammatory response to surgical sepsis
Resources in Trauma

 

Completed Research

Institutional Award                          Rosengart (PI)                                    10/01/2011 – 9/31/2013
Office of Science and Medicine
Resources in Trauma
The major goals of this project are to develop an algorithm of CT imaging, physiologic parameters, and biochemical analysis that predict the absolute absence of significant injury and enables the safe triage of trauma patients for emergency room discharge.
 
Surgical Infection Society               Rosengart (PI)                                    8/01/2010 – 7/31/2012
SIS Resident Research Fellowship Award
The major goals of this project are to support a 2 year fellowship of a resident in the laboratory of the PI. The focus of the project is the role of calcium signaling and calcium/calmodulin-depenent protein kinases in regulating autophagy during sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.
 
AAST                                                 Rosengart (PI)                        7/01/2009 – 6/30/2011           
Novo Nordisk Research Fellowship                                     
Blood cell storage duration alters the inflammation and organ dysfunction after traumatic injury
This proposal will test whether red cell transfusion can alter systemic chemokine concentrations in critically ill trauma patients by comparing intra-individual responses pre- and post-transfusion. Furthermore, we will determine the association between these characteristics and the risk of subsequent ARDS, MODS, and death.
 
1 KL2 RR-024154-03                                     Rosengart (PI)            7/01/2005 – 6/30/2009           
The appropriateness of calcium supplementation in critical illness  
The major goals of this project were to define the biology of calcium signaling during sepsis and the biological and clinical ramifications of calcium supplementation during sepsis.
 
Samuel and Emma Winters Foundation Rosengart (PI)               8/01/2005 – 7/31/2006           
Foundation Research Award                                                             
The appropriateness of calcium supplementation in critical illness  
The major goals of this project are to define the biology of calcium signaling during sepsis and the biological and clinical ramifications of calcium supplementation during sepsis.