About the Safar Center

The Safar Center for Resuscitation Research at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine was founded by the late Dr. Peter Safar in 1979, initially as the International Resuscitation Research Center. In recognition of Dr. Safar's innumerable contributions to the field of resuscitation medicine, it was renamed the Safar Center for Resuscitation Research in 1994. The Safar Center's current research programs include Traumatic Brain Injury, Child Abuse, Cardiac Arrest, Emergency Preservation and Resuscitation, Hemorrhagic Shock, Combat Casualty Care, and Rehabilitation of CNS Injury. Center investigators work closely with the clinical depts. of Critical Care Medicine, Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of CNS Injury. Center investigators work closely with the depts. of Critical Care Medicine, Surgery, Neurological Surgery, Anesthesiology, Emergency Medicine, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at both the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh. In addition to conducting basic research, the Safar Center also provides training to the next generation of resuscitation researchers. The Center is a 20,000 square-feet freestanding research facility that houses the laboratories of scientists and clinician-scientists working across a broad spectrum of fields important to resuscitation medicine.

About the CRISMA Center

The Clinical Research, Investigation, and Systems Modeling of Acute Illness (CRISMA) Center is directed by Derek C. Angus MD, MPH, and is comprised of six programs: Systems biology directed by Gilles Clermont MD, MSc; Healthcare Policy and Management to be directed by Jeremy Kahn, MD, MS; Bioengineering and Organ Support directed by John Kellum, MD; CRISMA-Kids directed by R Scott Watson, MD, MPH; Ethics and Decision-Making directed by Douglas White, MD, MAS; and Clinical Epidemiology directed by Dr. Angus. CRISMA includes adult and pediatric critical care researchers and dedicated research staff that specialize in translational research of the acutely ill. This large team of clinician-scientists, mathematicians, and epidemiologists enjoys superb funding from the NIH and multiple industrial sponsors.

Regarded by many as one of world's foremost translational research groups with 16 core faculty members and over 14 million dollars in federal research funding, CRISMA is actively studying sepsis, a syndrome that affects about 750,000 Americans every year and carries a mortality rate of almost 30 percent, and sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. This team of scientists has published papers in leading journals such as the New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Critical Care Medicine, the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Kidney international, and the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

CRISMA also collaborates with industry, advises in clinical trial design and implementation, and mentors clinical and research fellows, most of whom are simultaneously completing advanced training in clinical and health services research through the Masters in Public Health (MPH) program at the Graduate School of Public Health, the Clinical Research Training Program, or the Clinician Educator Training Program.